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The Next Recession May Come By Stealth

Markets have been blowing hot and cold regarding the prospects of a recession in the U.S. The Institute of Supply Management’s November survey shows that the index of factory activities in the U.S. fell to 48.1 from 48.3 in October (any reading below 50 is indicative of a contraction). This is confounding the expectation that America’s domestic industrial production would improve in anticipation of a “deal” in the U.S.-China trade war. However, the Department of Labor also reported that 266,000 jobs have been added to the economy in November, bringing unemployment rate down to a historic low of 3.5%. A confusing situation has just been made more confusing. It has been said that generals are always fighting the last war. It’s not that different when it comes to fighting economic downturns. Since the global financial crisis a decade ago, we have been scouring the horizon for any signs of financial fragility, such as asset bubbles, that could plunge us into the next global recession. Despite mounting evidence of a weakening economy, there are no asset bubbles comparable to that of the pre-2008 period. And we won’t find any, even as we edge closer to the next recession. Since the last global financial crisis, the global economy has been reshaped by different forces, and the coming recession will be caused by factors totally different from those of the last one. First off, the global economy today is mired in uncertainty arising from the trade war, an enfeebled Europe, Brexit and rising geopolitical tensions. An even deeper source of uncertainty is that the liberal global economic order, in place since the 1950s, is dying. Two trends are converging to kill it. The first is the West’s declining economic dominance relative to the rest of the world, and China in particular. The second is the rise of populism in Western democracies, arguably the most serious challenge to the legitimacy of the liberal global order. And yet, even as the liberal global economic order fades away, it’s unclear what a post-liberal global economic order will look like. So for now, the global economy is like a barfly at closing time: it has no clue where it’s going, but it can’t stay here. Developed world economies have meanwhile been seriously weakened by prolonged zero interest rates, making them vulnerable to unexpected shocks. Extraordinarily low interest rates distort the price of money, arguably the single most important price signal in a market economy. They poison the business environment, allowing poorly run businesses to survive, jamming the gears of creative destruction that drive any economic renewal. The survival of poorly run businesses also suck profits from more successful businesses, sapping their ability to expand. Against this backdrop, any number of missteps could trigger chain reactions that push developed world economies into recession. But we should also be prepared for a potentially different kind of downturn. The accepted definition of a recession is two consecutive quarters of contraction in an economy.… Read more

sample accessily post 1

The Next Recession May Come By Stealth

Markets have been blowing hot and cold regarding the prospects of a recession in the U.S. The Institute of Supply Management’s November survey shows that the index of factory activities in the U.S. fell to 48.1 from 48.3 in October (any reading below 50 is indicative of a contraction). This is confounding the expectation that America’s domestic industrial production would improve in anticipation of a “deal” in the U.S.-China trade war. However, the Department of Labor also reported that 266,000 jobs have been added to the economy in November, bringing unemployment rate down to a historic low of 3.5%. A confusing situation has just been made more confusing. It has been said that generals are always fighting the last war. It’s not that different when it comes to fighting economic downturns. Since the global financial crisis a decade ago, we have been scouring the horizon for any signs of financial fragility, such as asset bubbles, that could plunge us into the next global recession. Despite mounting evidence of a weakening economy, there are no asset bubbles comparable to that of the pre-2008 period. And we won’t find any, even as we edge closer to the next recession. Since the last global financial crisis, the global economy has been reshaped by different forces, and the coming recession will be caused by factors totally different from those of the last one. First off, the global economy today is mired in uncertainty arising from the trade war, an enfeebled Europe, Brexit and rising geopolitical tensions. An even deeper source of uncertainty is that the liberal global economic order, in place since the 1950s, is dying. Two trends are converging to kill it. The first is the West’s declining economic dominance relative to the rest of the world, and China in particular. The second is the rise of populism in Western democracies, arguably the most serious challenge to the legitimacy of the liberal global order. And yet, even as the liberal global economic order fades away, it’s unclear what a post-liberal global economic order will look like. So for now, the global economy is like a barfly at closing time: it has no clue where it’s going, but it can’t stay here. Developed world economies have meanwhile been seriously weakened by prolonged zero interest rates, making them vulnerable to unexpected shocks. Extraordinarily low interest rates distort the price of money, arguably the single most important price signal in a market economy. They poison the business environment, allowing poorly run businesses to survive, jamming the gears of creative destruction that drive any economic renewal. The survival of poorly run businesses also suck profits from more successful businesses, sapping their ability to expand. Against this backdrop, any number of missteps could trigger chain reactions that push developed world economies into recession. But we should also be prepared for a potentially different kind of downturn. The accepted definition of a recession is two consecutive quarters of contraction in an economy.… Read more

sample accessily post 1

The Next Recession May Come By Stealth

Markets have been blowing hot and cold regarding the prospects of a recession in the U.S. The Institute of Supply Management’s November survey shows that the index of factory activities in the U.S. fell to 48.1 from 48.3 in October (any reading below 50 is indicative of a contraction). This is confounding the expectation that America’s domestic industrial production would improve in anticipation of a “deal” in the U.S.-China trade war. However, the Department of Labor also reported that 266,000 jobs have been added to the economy in November, bringing unemployment rate down to a historic low of 3.5%. A confusing situation has just been made more confusing. It has been said that generals are always fighting the last war. It’s not that different when it comes to fighting economic downturns. Since the global financial crisis a decade ago, we have been scouring the horizon for any signs of financial fragility, such as asset bubbles, that could plunge us into the next global recession. Despite mounting evidence of a weakening economy, there are no asset bubbles comparable to that of the pre-2008 period. And we won’t find any, even as we edge closer to the next recession. Since the last global financial crisis, the global economy has been reshaped by different forces, and the coming recession will be caused by factors totally different from those of the last one. First off, the global economy today is mired in uncertainty arising from the trade war, an enfeebled Europe, Brexit and rising geopolitical tensions. An even deeper source of uncertainty is that the liberal global economic order, in place since the 1950s, is dying. Two trends are converging to kill it. The first is the West’s declining economic dominance relative to the rest of the world, and China in particular. The second is the rise of populism in Western democracies, arguably the most serious challenge to the legitimacy of the liberal global order. And yet, even as the liberal global economic order fades away, it’s unclear what a post-liberal global economic order will look like. So for now, the global economy is like a barfly at closing time: it has no clue where it’s going, but it can’t stay here. Developed world economies have meanwhile been seriously weakened by prolonged zero interest rates, making them vulnerable to unexpected shocks. Extraordinarily low interest rates distort the price of money, arguably the single most important price signal in a market economy. They poison the business environment, allowing poorly run businesses to survive, jamming the gears of creative destruction that drive any economic renewal. The survival of poorly run businesses also suck profits from more successful businesses, sapping their ability to expand. Against this backdrop, any number of missteps could trigger chain reactions that push developed world economies into recession. But we should also be prepared for a potentially different kind of downturn. The accepted definition of a recession is two consecutive quarters of contraction in an economy.… Read more

sample accessily post 1

The Next Recession May Come By Stealth

Markets have been blowing hot and cold regarding the prospects of a recession in the U.S. The Institute of Supply Management’s November survey shows that the index of factory activities in the U.S. fell to 48.1 from 48.3 in October (any reading below 50 is indicative of a contraction). This is confounding the expectation that America’s domestic industrial production would improve in anticipation of a “deal” in the U.S.-China trade war. However, the Department of Labor also reported that 266,000 jobs have been added to the economy in November, bringing unemployment rate down to a historic low of 3.5%. A confusing situation has just been made more confusing. It has been said that generals are always fighting the last war. It’s not that different when it comes to fighting economic downturns. Since the global financial crisis a decade ago, we have been scouring the horizon for any signs of financial fragility, such as asset bubbles, that could plunge us into the next global recession. Despite mounting evidence of a weakening economy, there are no asset bubbles comparable to that of the pre-2008 period. And we won’t find any, even as we edge closer to the next recession. Since the last global financial crisis, the global economy has been reshaped by different forces, and the coming recession will be caused by factors totally different from those of the last one. First off, the global economy today is mired in uncertainty arising from the trade war, an enfeebled Europe, Brexit and rising geopolitical tensions. An even deeper source of uncertainty is that the liberal global economic order, in place since the 1950s, is dying. Two trends are converging to kill it. The first is the West’s declining economic dominance relative to the rest of the world, and China in particular. The second is the rise of populism in Western democracies, arguably the most serious challenge to the legitimacy of the liberal global order. And yet, even as the liberal global economic order fades away, it’s unclear what a post-liberal global economic order will look like. So for now, the global economy is like a barfly at closing time: it has no clue where it’s going, but it can’t stay here. Developed world economies have meanwhile been seriously weakened by prolonged zero interest rates, making them vulnerable to unexpected shocks. Extraordinarily low interest rates distort the price of money, arguably the single most important price signal in a market economy. They poison the business environment, allowing poorly run businesses to survive, jamming the gears of creative destruction that drive any economic renewal. The survival of poorly run businesses also suck profits from more successful businesses, sapping their ability to expand. Against this backdrop, any number of missteps could trigger chain reactions that push developed world economies into recession. But we should also be prepared for a potentially different kind of downturn. The accepted definition of a recession is two consecutive quarters of contraction in an economy.… Read more

sample accessily post 1

The Next Recession May Come By Stealth

Markets have been blowing hot and cold regarding the prospects of a recession in the U.S. The Institute of Supply Management’s November survey shows that the index of factory activities in the U.S. fell to 48.1 from 48.3 in October (any reading below 50 is indicative of a contraction). This is confounding the expectation that America’s domestic industrial production would improve in anticipation of a “deal” in the U.S.-China trade war. However, the Department of Labor also reported that 266,000 jobs have been added to the economy in November, bringing unemployment rate down to a historic low of 3.5%. A confusing situation has just been made more confusing. It has been said that generals are always fighting the last war. It’s not that different when it comes to fighting economic downturns. Since the global financial crisis a decade ago, we have been scouring the horizon for any signs of financial fragility, such as asset bubbles, that could plunge us into the next global recession. Despite mounting evidence of a weakening economy, there are no asset bubbles comparable to that of the pre-2008 period. And we won’t find any, even as we edge closer to the next recession. Since the last global financial crisis, the global economy has been reshaped by different forces, and the coming recession will be caused by factors totally different from those of the last one. First off, the global economy today is mired in uncertainty arising from the trade war, an enfeebled Europe, Brexit and rising geopolitical tensions. An even deeper source of uncertainty is that the liberal global economic order, in place since the 1950s, is dying. Two trends are converging to kill it. The first is the West’s declining economic dominance relative to the rest of the world, and China in particular. The second is the rise of populism in Western democracies, arguably the most serious challenge to the legitimacy of the liberal global order. And yet, even as the liberal global economic order fades away, it’s unclear what a post-liberal global economic order will look like. So for now, the global economy is like a barfly at closing time: it has no clue where it’s going, but it can’t stay here. Developed world economies have meanwhile been seriously weakened by prolonged zero interest rates, making them vulnerable to unexpected shocks. Extraordinarily low interest rates distort the price of money, arguably the single most important price signal in a market economy. They poison the business environment, allowing poorly run businesses to survive, jamming the gears of creative destruction that drive any economic renewal. The survival of poorly run businesses also suck profits from more successful businesses, sapping their ability to expand. Against this backdrop, any number of missteps could trigger chain reactions that push developed world economies into recession. But we should also be prepared for a potentially different kind of downturn. The accepted definition of a recession is two consecutive quarters of contraction in an economy.… Read more

sample accessily post 1

The Next Recession May Come By Stealth

Markets have been blowing hot and cold regarding the prospects of a recession in the U.S. The Institute of Supply Management’s November survey shows that the index of factory activities in the U.S. fell to 48.1 from 48.3 in October (any reading below 50 is indicative of a contraction). This is confounding the expectation that America’s domestic industrial production would improve in anticipation of a “deal” in the U.S.-China trade war. However, the Department of Labor also reported that 266,000 jobs have been added to the economy in November, bringing unemployment rate down to a historic low of 3.5%. A confusing situation has just been made more confusing. It has been said that generals are always fighting the last war. It’s not that different when it comes to fighting economic downturns. Since the global financial crisis a decade ago, we have been scouring the horizon for any signs of financial fragility, such as asset bubbles, that could plunge us into the next global recession. Despite mounting evidence of a weakening economy, there are no asset bubbles comparable to that of the pre-2008 period. And we won’t find any, even as we edge closer to the next recession. Since the last global financial crisis, the global economy has been reshaped by different forces, and the coming recession will be caused by factors totally different from those of the last one. First off, the global economy today is mired in uncertainty arising from the trade war, an enfeebled Europe, Brexit and rising geopolitical tensions. An even deeper source of uncertainty is that the liberal global economic order, in place since the 1950s, is dying. Two trends are converging to kill it. The first is the West’s declining economic dominance relative to the rest of the world, and China in particular. The second is the rise of populism in Western democracies, arguably the most serious challenge to the legitimacy of the liberal global order. And yet, even as the liberal global economic order fades away, it’s unclear what a post-liberal global economic order will look like. So for now, the global economy is like a barfly at closing time: it has no clue where it’s going, but it can’t stay here. Developed world economies have meanwhile been seriously weakened by prolonged zero interest rates, making them vulnerable to unexpected shocks. Extraordinarily low interest rates distort the price of money, arguably the single most important price signal in a market economy. They poison the business environment, allowing poorly run businesses to survive, jamming the gears of creative destruction that drive any economic renewal. The survival of poorly run businesses also suck profits from more successful businesses, sapping their ability to expand. Against this backdrop, any number of missteps could trigger chain reactions that push developed world economies into recession. But we should also be prepared for a potentially different kind of downturn. The accepted definition of a recession is two consecutive quarters of contraction in an economy.… Read more

sample accessily post 1

The Next Recession May Come By Stealth

Markets have been blowing hot and cold regarding the prospects of a recession in the U.S. The Institute of Supply Management’s November survey shows that the index of factory activities in the U.S. fell to 48.1 from 48.3 in October (any reading below 50 is indicative of a contraction). This is confounding the expectation that America’s domestic industrial production would improve in anticipation of a “deal” in the U.S.-China trade war. However, the Department of Labor also reported that 266,000 jobs have been added to the economy in November, bringing unemployment rate down to a historic low of 3.5%. A confusing situation has just been made more confusing. It has been said that generals are always fighting the last war. It’s not that different when it comes to fighting economic downturns. Since the global financial crisis a decade ago, we have been scouring the horizon for any signs of financial fragility, such as asset bubbles, that could plunge us into the next global recession. Despite mounting evidence of a weakening economy, there are no asset bubbles comparable to that of the pre-2008 period. And we won’t find any, even as we edge closer to the next recession. Since the last global financial crisis, the global economy has been reshaped by different forces, and the coming recession will be caused by factors totally different from those of the last one. First off, the global economy today is mired in uncertainty arising from the trade war, an enfeebled Europe, Brexit and rising geopolitical tensions. An even deeper source of uncertainty is that the liberal global economic order, in place since the 1950s, is dying. Two trends are converging to kill it. The first is the West’s declining economic dominance relative to the rest of the world, and China in particular. The second is the rise of populism in Western democracies, arguably the most serious challenge to the legitimacy of the liberal global order. And yet, even as the liberal global economic order fades away, it’s unclear what a post-liberal global economic order will look like. So for now, the global economy is like a barfly at closing time: it has no clue where it’s going, but it can’t stay here. Developed world economies have meanwhile been seriously weakened by prolonged zero interest rates, making them vulnerable to unexpected shocks. Extraordinarily low interest rates distort the price of money, arguably the single most important price signal in a market economy. They poison the business environment, allowing poorly run businesses to survive, jamming the gears of creative destruction that drive any economic renewal. The survival of poorly run businesses also suck profits from more successful businesses, sapping their ability to expand. Against this backdrop, any number of missteps could trigger chain reactions that push developed world economies into recession. But we should also be prepared for a potentially different kind of downturn. The accepted definition of a recession is two consecutive quarters of contraction in an economy.… Read more

The most magnificent temples of South India

Temples are an abode of peace. They uphold the principles of the ancient Indian culture. They are centers of Spirituality. The Southern part of India celebrates its grandeur in the form of the most spectacularly built temples. The temples of South India are marvelously built in the Dravidian style of Architecture or the Vijayanagara style of architecture. They are made of very intricate stone carvings, very tall gopurams, massive pillars, beautifully built shrines, etc. These temples tell the tales of the grandeur of the Emperors that ruled South India. A vacation visiting all these temples will surely be a great Idea. You can enjoy the inner peace that you feel when you visit temples as well as enjoy the beauty of the rich architecture.  Are you wondering which places to visit? Here is a list of the most beautiful temples in South India.

Meenakshi Temple

This temple is dedicated to Goddess Parvati, The consort of Lord Shiva. It is located in Madurai, a city in Tamilnadu. One can book their Mumbai to Chennai flights to get here. Mumbai to Chennai flights are the best means of conveyance to get here. From Chennai, you can travel to Madurai by Bus or by a Taxi. This structure is undoubtedly an architectural marvel. It was one of the nominees for seven wonders of the world.

Virupaksha temple

This temple is a pride of the Vijayanagara Empire. It is a UNESCO World Heritage site. It was built in the 7th century. Its spectacular gopuram is the major attraction of this temple. This beautiful temple dedicated to Lord Virupaksha stands proudly on the banks of river Tungabhadra.

Aihole and Pattadakal

These temples are a pride of Karnataka.This temple was built by the Chalukyas in the 5th century. These temples were built in the capital city of Chalukyas. Aihole is well known as “Cradle of Hindu Rock Architecture”. Aihole is dedicated to Goddess Durga. Pattadakal houses many temples like Jain temple, Sangameshwara temple, Mallikarjuna temple and so on.

Tirupati

The Lord Venkateshwara temple in Tirupati is one of the most visited temples in the World. This temple is situated in a hill station names Tirumala. The beauty of the lush green mountains increases the grandeur of this temple. This temple is one of the richest temples in the world. It is believed that this temple was built in 300 AD.

Padmanabhaswamy temple

The Padmanabhaswamy temple is located in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala. This temple was built in the 16th century, and it is one of the richest temples in the World. This temple is dedicated to Lord Vishnu. The shrine has a beautiful idol of Lord Vishnu in the” Anantha Shayanam” posture. This temple has intricately carved walls and a majestic gopuram.

Nataraja temple, Chidambaram

This is another architectural marvel in Tamilnadu. You can get here by traveling by Mumbai to Chennaiflights. In this temple, Lord Shiva is worshipped as the lord of dance forms. The architecture in this temple symbolizes art; It establishes connectivity with …

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Let Your Destination Wedding Be the Perfect One in the Following Locations

While many events may happen in your life, your wedding ceremony is one of the best events that you will always remember in your life. Many wedding events may not be successful mainly because they are not held in an excellent location that can make the event to be always remembered. While there are many places where you can consider holding your wedding ceremony you need to be careful when choosing the destination so that you can get the best experience. The place you choose will determine whether your wedding will be great and successful. In this article, you will discover great places where you can get the best wedding experience.

Beach wedding

Have you ever thought of holding a beach wedding? A beach wedding can be a wonderful experience because of the beauty of nature and relaxation that comes with a beach wedding. When it comes to a perfect wedding in Bali, you can choose Morabito beach which is located on the west coast of Bali. Here you can be sure that the experience will be wonderful and great. The location is unique since it is located directly facing the Indian Ocean and it is in a tropical flower park. The Morabito Art villa can be the perfect choice for your wedding because it has many great features that will ensure that throughout the event you are relaxed and happy.

Villa wedding in Bali is a perfect wedding destination

Bali is known for having many wonderful places where your wedding can take place. With a magnificent villa in Bali, you can be sure that the wedding experience will be a perfect one and you can be accompanied by the people that you love most so that they make the event enjoyable and even memorable. With a villa wedding in Bali, you will come across gorgeous natural attractions that will be breathtaking. That is why the island has been sought after by even celebrities who want to make their wedding a good experience.

Bali chapel wedding

You may also want your wedding to take place in a chapel. In this case, you are also good to choose a chapel wedding in Bali. If you do so, your wedding will take place in a classic and also magnificent chapel in Bali. Your wedding is a big event in your lifetime, and you should not just want it to take place in your local chapel where you have been attending since you were born. The wedding ceremony should be a great one where you will be in a unique and attractive chapel where you have not been since you were born. Your big wedding day will also feature traditions in Bali, and you will experience a traditional Bali wedding but in a modern way. When it comes to organising a successful wedding, you should think of hiring experts who have the right experience when it comes to organizing weddings. For example, The Seven Agency in Bali can be a good place …

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5 Reasons for an RV vacation – What drives you for choosing an RV?

Many people dream of RVing throughout the United States of America or in Australia, as the idea of unbridled freedom to go wherever the wind leads you is something that they love. Who would not love the idea of feeling comfortable in your home after reaching unfamiliar territory? With an RV, you won’t need to pack or unpack, you can work while traveling, and sleep whenever and wherever you want to when.  In fact, RVing is more like cruising on land, with all the comforts of luxuries minus the buffet and gym.

If you’ve already romanticized the idea of an RV vacation, you must be wondering how to go about it.. Opting for an RV rental is one of the best options when it comes to taking an RV vacation, but you also need to know what the  reasons are that will drive you towards traveling in an RV. Here are few that you may consider.

Reason #1: You can get closer to nature

If you’re someone who is head over heels in love with nature and the  amazing outdoors, traveling in an RV is one of the greatest ways of enjoying your vacation. You will have the freedom to stop anywhere and visit the national parks, the popular landmarks and enjoy the natural settings amidst the fresh air. You can go out fishing or on a hike and try canoeing or river rafting. You may even get some exercise done and while doing nothing apart from enjoying the natural surroundings.

Reason #2: You get the comfort of your home

It is possible to get the best of both worlds when you take a trip in an RV. Instead of camping in a tent, you can enjoy the great outdoors. Regardless of whether you rent an RV or you own it, all RVs are well equipped with the things you will need. You will most probably have a microwave in your kitchen, as well as a stove and a fridge, and a TV in the dining and living areas if space permits. If you wish to, you may stay inside and if you wish to visit the outdoors, you can do so as well.

Reason #3: A cool option for kids

Embarking on an RV vacation is one of the best ways of traveling along with your children. They have the full freedom of participating in campground activities and playing. They’ll meet other kids and they’ll find out new places for exploring. Children of all age will love the campfire and what could be better if the campfire is accompanied by songs, stories and gazing at stars. For the kids too, an RV vacation is full of adventure.

Reason #4: You get choices of campgrounds

Just like hotels, you get to choose your RV parks and campgrounds. During the peak season and the ultimate tourist seasons, you need to make reservations ahead of time. Watch out for the amenities which are vital for you. The campgrounds might have …

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